Powers of Attorney allow another to manage our affairs on our behalf. They can range from a simple power to allow someone to sign a document for us during a temporary absence or indisposition to a Continuing and Welfare Power of Attorney which allows the attorney to act for us even after the loss of legal capacity. Accident, illness or other misfortune can strike you at any stage in life leaving you legally unable to administer your own affairs. Who will run your business, sell your company, access your bank account, pay your or your family's bills, decide where you should live, or conduct any other legal or financial steps for you in that event?  Unless a suitable Power of Attorney has been signed by you it might be necessary to apply to the Court for the appointment of a guardian. The costs of appointment of a guardian greatly exceed the costs of granting a Power of Attorney and the appointment can take considerable time, potentially creating difficulties. Most of us should consider putting a Power of Attorney in place and we are happy to advise on the options and to draw one up for you.